April 16th, 2013

Weltbilder” master course

This semester, I taught a master course on information visualization at HfK Bremen. It was quite fun and I think I was able improve a bit on the teaching side compared to the first full course I taught two years ago.

The topic was “Weltbilder” — “World views” which has become sort of a theme for my work lately. Here are the introductory slides and reference projects:


The course took place on 8 full days over the course of four weeks in February and March 2013. Overall, I had more than 20 students in the course (although some were only listening in without handing in a final project). The first few sessions were partly filled with me teaching basic craftmanship (slides—30MB) and establishing context, while the students gave presentations on some of my favorite scientific papers and articles (dropbox) and practitioners (such as Nathalie Miebach, Stefanie Posavec, Density Design, Santiago Ortiz, Nicholas Felton, Periscopic, Stamen, Ben Fry, Martin Wattenberg & Fernanda Viegas and the NYT graphics desk). We also had a few practical exercises on drawing family trees and fixing broken charts.

The second half of the course was much concerned with the student’s projects, and I did mostly 1:1 consultations. You can find a few of the final projects here. I like how the course results reflect the diversity of the students themselves — we had artists, computer scientists, journalists, people from humanities — quite a mixed bunch. Overall, I am quite happy with how things worked out and hope I could excite a few of my students to keep doing things in this field :)

Here are two of my favorite projects:





but in sum, they were all pretty nice in one way or the other :) Here’s the gallery

April 6th, 2013

Look ma, no story!

Storytelling has been one of the big buzzwords in data visualization the last year. By now, there are even whole conferences about the topic and I heard even some podcasts carry the word in their name :D

So, one could be tempted to think that storytelling is the magical ingredient to turn boring charts into killer visuals, make the blind see and save the world at large.

But, as so often, the pure and simple truth is rarely pure and never simple.

In fact, some of my favorite visualizations have no story to them.

map-market

Look at the legendary map of the market. A fantastic tool to understand the state of the stock market at one glance.

koblin-flight-patterns

Consider Aaron Koblin’s Flight Patterns.

xkcd-tic

The brilliant map of optimal tic-tac-toe moves by xkcd.

And so on.

Tools have no stories to them. Tools can reveal stories, help us tell stories, but they are neither the story itself nor the storyteller.

Portraits have no story to them either. Like a photo portrait of a person, a visualization portrait of a data set can allow you to capture many facets of a bigger whole, but there is not a single story there, either.

Let us not forget about these important genres. There is more to information visualization than punchlines.

Update: After a few twitter discussions, here is a clarification: I argue against the often heard claim “every good visualization tells a story”. I would agree that, in a loose reading of the word, you could say that some of the above visualizations “reveal stories” or might “trigger stories” in the viewer’s mind.

March 18th, 2013

Resonet

Resonet is an attempt to map the twitter community around the resonate festival, using a technique similar to the vizosphere I made earlier. This time around, I used a zoomable SVG map, which makes text labels searchable. Make sure to also check out the data files and analysis, and feel free to remix the data!

December 6th, 2012

Where people move in Germany

A quick diversion based on Bing search results for the phrase “von X nach Y gezogen” (“moved from X to Y”) applied to the top 30 German cities.

Made with Gephi and pattern.py

Image
Data
Script

December 6th, 2012

Mapping research excellence

Together with Lutz Bornmann, Rüdiger Mutz and Felix de Moya Anegon, I have been looking into which institutions (universities or research-focused institutions) are most active in different subject areas of science and which have published the most excellent papers. Based on my colleagues data analysis, we produced a small web application which allows to browse and explore the data set. The application is password protected, so you will need to end an email to password-request at excellencemapping.net to request access.

December 6th, 2012

FIFA Development Globe

We finally launched the FIFA Development Globe, a project that has been in the making over the whole year. High fives and congrats to my fellow colleagues at Medienfabrik, Studio NAND, and Jens Franke. It was great to collaborate with you.

September 28th, 2012

Information is Beautiful Award

As you know, I was never too fond of awards — until I won two of them in one night :)

September 20th, 2012

emoto data sculpture

We just finished the documentation for emoto – a data art project visualising the online response to the Olympics London 2012.

In many ways, the crowning piece of the project, and a conceptual counterpoint to the ephemeral web activities, our data sculpture preserved the more than 12 million tweets we collected in physical form. We had 17 plates CNC-milled — one for each day of the games — with a relief heatmap indicating the emotional highs and lows of each day. Overlay projections highlighted individual stories, and visitors could scroll through the most retweeted tweets per hour for each story using a control knob.

The tweets and topics displayed in the installation can also be investigated in interactive heatmaps. Rollover the rows to see a tooltip display of the most retweeted tweet on the given topic at the respective point in time.

Thanks so much to my fantastic collaborators at Studio NAND, and Drew Hemment and the team at and around Future Everything and everyone involved!

Plenty-plenty Sentimenti!


Find a brief documentation at moritz.stefaner.eu/projects/emoto/

or read more on the project here:
nand.io/visualisation/emoto-installation
nand.io/visualisation/emoto
Article and interview on Creators Project
Data Stories podcast episode #11 with Stephan Thiel on emoto

August 15th, 2012

Images as datastore

In two current projects, we use images as a datastore in parts of our processing timeline, and that proved quite handy, so I thought, I would briefly share the technique with you.

In the emoto project, we use 2D matrices to store how many tweets (brightness) fall in which sentiment category (vertical) over time (horizontal):

This is not exciting per se, but the trick here is that we use this as an elevation map for the 3D models we produce for the data sculpture. So the images are only a “messenger” between two processing steps — data analysis and the 3D modelling tool. Yet, in this form, it is much more easy to detect gaps, and get a glimpse of the data structure immediately. Also, think about it this way — if your database is an image, you can apply image transformation techniques to modify your data! (Think enhance contrast, minimum/maximum, slicing, blurring,…) What can be very difficult numeric operations if only working with numbers, can be very simple operations in Photoshop, and, again, the result is immediately inspectable. The catch is, when working with grey scale, you have only 256 steps available — but in our case, that was enough.

The second trick is to use color as a lookup hash in a 2D matrix. For instance, you might want to check in which country a certain point on earth is. You do have a list of polygons for each country, but how inefficient, error prone and tedious it is to loop through all of them, and calculate a hit test with a polygon… Also, how do you calculate a hit test with a polygon, anyways?

Now here is an incredibly simple way to do it: Pick a unique color for each country. Go through all the polygons of a country and draw them on a simple map mapping lat and long to x and y coordinates in the desired precision.

Now, for any point on earth, you just need to look up the color of the pixel belonging to its map coordinate, and — there you have the code of the corresponding country. Very handy! Again, all the difficult data processing has been taken care of by the image processing algorithm..

So, next time you have a tricky data transformation issue to solve — maybe image processing can be part of the solution! I am sure there are many more tricks along these lines to discover.

( + Thanks to Stephan and Steffen from Studio NAND for developing these workflows with me!)

 

July 31st, 2012

emoto

A true mamooth project has finally launched: emoto.

Together with a huge team around Drew Hemment and Studio NAND, and a partnership with MIT Senseable City Lab, we aim at visualising the online reponse to the Olympic Games for the London 2012 Festival and Cultural Olympiad in the Northwest.

Basically, the idea is to track Twitter messages for content (which topics, disciplines, athletes etc they refer) to and emotional tone (are they cheering, swearing, being indifferent) and make that info available real-time on http://emoto2012.org, as a supplement or even alternative to traditional ways of consuming the Games coverage.

Our goal is to reveal both the big picture as well as the little anecdotes that make up the big, big stream of messages.

After the games, we will turn the collected tweets into an actual physical object, to archive these ephemeral little “things flying by” forever.

And during the games, we are posting insights and in-depth analyses (here is a first post on the Opening Ceremony), so there is also a little data journalistic angle to the whole package.

I have to say, this is probably one of the most ambitious projects I have worked on this far, and despite some small rocks encountered along the way, I am really happy how it turned out.. I hope you like it, too!